{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:astrobob.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":2625,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"astrobob.areavoices.com/105991","permalink":"http://astrobob.areavoices.com/2014/07/22/how-to-find-the-center-of-the-milky-way-and-what-lurks-there/","blogid":"85","blogdomain":"astrobob.areavoices.com","hostname":"astrobob.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"How to find the center of the Milky Way ... and what lurks there","content":"[caption id=\"attachment_105992\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"864\"] Want to know where the center of our galaxy is? Face south around nightfall in late July and find the Teapot of Sagittarius about 'two fists' to the left of bright Antares in Scorpius. The core is a blank bit of sky just above the spout near the 4.5 magnitude star 3 Sagittarii.  Stellarium[/caption]\n\nEver stared straight at the heart of the Milky Way galaxy? Give it a try this coming week. With dark skies and no moon, the time is right.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105993\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"400\"] Artist's view of the 4 million mass black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The hole measures about 28 million miles in diameter. Credit: NASA[/caption]\n\nNotice I didn't say into the heart. No human eyes can penetrate the veil of interstellar dust that cloaks the galactic central point 26,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius. Only X-ray, gamma ray and radio telescopes can 'part the way' and expose the galaxy's dark secret which astronomers call Sagittarius A*.\n\nThere, at the center of it all, lies a black hole with a mass of 4 million suns. The innermost 3.2 light years centered on the black hole swarms with thousands of aged stars and about 100 fresh-born ones, some in very tight orbits about the hole. Gas clouds abound, and there's at least another smaller black hole nearby.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105994\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"800\"] NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, captured these first, focused views of the supermassive black hole at the heart of our galaxy in high-energy X-ray light. Known as Sagittarius A* (A star), the bright flare formed when Sgr A* was consuming and heating matter. The background image, taken in infrared light, shows its location. Credit: NASA[/caption]\n\nOccasionally the central black hole flares to life when a random asteroid, gas cloud or stray star passes too close and gets ripped to pieces before disappearing down the gullet of the beast. Heated by friction, the material sends out every type of light from visible to X-rays and gamma rays. But no one can see all the excitement because it's hidden by light years of dust grains. To the eye, the center looks nondescript and static, but nothing could be further from the truth.\n\nThe Milky Way is beautiful to gaze at this time of year. Take a drive to the country and park your car where the sky is dark and open to the south. At nightfall, you'll see a fiery-hued star a few fists up from the southern horizon at nightfall. That's Antares in Scorpius. Now shift your gaze two fists to the left or east and see if you can spot the outline of the Teapot. Once you've found it, galactic center lies just above the spout.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105995\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"395\"] Closeup of the Spout showing a couple bright star clusters and the Lagoon Nebula, a rich star-forming region. Credit: Bob King[/caption]\n\nThough the center remains hidden, large chunks of the Milky Way hover like clouds against the black sky. Every puffy piece is comprised of billions of distant stars the light of which blends together to form a misty haze. Here and there are smaller knots. These are individual gas clouds called nebulae and bright star clusters. A pair of 40-50mm binoculars will show many of these wonders and countless fainter stars plainly. If we could magically remove the dust between us and the galactic center, the rich intensity of stars in the Sagittarius direction would be bright enough to cast shadows at night.\n\nTake it all in. Let your eyes follow the arc from the southern horizon clear up across the eastern sky and back down to the northeastern horizon. We live here - can you believe it?","rawcontent":"[caption id=\"attachment_105992\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"864\"] Want to know where the center of our galaxy is? Face south around nightfall in late July and find the Teapot of Sagittarius about 'two fists' to the left of bright Antares in Scorpius. The core is a blank bit of sky just above the spout near the 4.5 magnitude star 3 Sagittarii. Stellarium[/caption]\n\nEver stared straight at the heart of the Milky Way galaxy? Give it a try this coming week. With dark skies and no moon, the time is right.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105993\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"400\"] Artist's view of the 4 million mass black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The hole measures about 28 million miles in diameter. Credit: NASA[/caption]\n\nNotice I didn't say into the heart. No human eyes can penetrate the veil of interstellar dust that cloaks the galactic central point 26,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius. Only X-ray, gamma ray and radio telescopes can 'part the way' and expose the galaxy's dark secret which astronomers call Sagittarius A*.\n\nThere, at the center of it all, lies a black hole with a mass of 4 million suns. The innermost 3.2 light years centered on the black hole swarms with thousands of aged stars and about 100 fresh-born ones, some in very tight orbits about the hole. Gas clouds abound, and there's at least another smaller black hole nearby.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105994\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"800\"] NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, captured these first, focused views of the supermassive black hole at the heart of our galaxy in high-energy X-ray light. Known as Sagittarius A* (A star), the bright flare formed when Sgr A* was consuming and heating matter. The background image, taken in infrared light, shows its location. Credit: NASA[/caption]\n\nOccasionally the central black hole flares to life when a random asteroid, gas cloud or stray star passes too close and gets ripped to pieces before disappearing down the gullet of the beast. Heated by friction, the material sends out every type of light from visible to X-rays and gamma rays. But no one can see all the excitement because it's hidden by light years of dust grains. To the eye, the center looks nondescript and static, but nothing could be further from the truth.\n\nThe Milky Way is beautiful to gaze at this time of year. Take a drive to the country and park your car where the sky is dark and open to the south. At nightfall, you'll see a fiery-hued star a few fists up from the southern horizon at nightfall. That's Antares in Scorpius. Now shift your gaze two fists to the left or east and see if you can spot the outline of the Teapot. Once you've found it, galactic center lies just above the spout.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105995\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"395\"] Closeup of the Spout showing a couple bright star clusters and the Lagoon Nebula, a rich star-forming region. Credit: Bob King[/caption]\n\nThough the center remains hidden, large chunks of the Milky Way hover like clouds against the black sky. Every puffy piece is comprised of billions of distant stars the light of which blends together to form a misty haze. Here and there are smaller knots. These are individual gas clouds called nebulae and bright star clusters. A pair of 40-50mm binoculars will show many of these wonders and countless fainter stars plainly. If we could magically remove the dust between us and the galactic center, the rich intensity of stars in the Sagittarius direction would be bright enough to cast shadows at night.\n\nTake it all in. Let your eyes follow the arc from the southern horizon clear up across the eastern sky and back down to the northeastern horizon. We live here - can you believe it?","contentnoshortcodes":"\n\nEver stared straight at the heart of the Milky Way galaxy? Give it a try this coming week. With dark skies and no moon, the time is right.\n\n\n\nNotice I didn't say into the heart. No human eyes can penetrate the veil of interstellar dust that cloaks the galactic central point 26,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius. Only X-ray, gamma ray and radio telescopes can 'part the way' and expose the galaxy's dark secret which astronomers call Sagittarius A*.\n\nThere, at the center of it all, lies a black hole with a mass of 4 million suns. The innermost 3.2 light years centered on the black hole swarms with thousands of aged stars and about 100 fresh-born ones, some in very tight orbits about the hole. Gas clouds abound, and there's at least another smaller black hole nearby.\n\n\n\nOccasionally the central black hole flares to life when a random asteroid, gas cloud or stray star passes too close and gets ripped to pieces before disappearing down the gullet of the beast. Heated by friction, the material sends out every type of light from visible to X-rays and gamma rays. But no one can see all the excitement because it's hidden by light years of dust grains. To the eye, the center looks nondescript and static, but nothing could be further from the truth.\n\nThe Milky Way is beautiful to gaze at this time of year. Take a drive to the country and park your car where the sky is dark and open to the south. At nightfall, you'll see a fiery-hued star a few fists up from the southern horizon at nightfall. That's Antares in Scorpius. Now shift your gaze two fists to the left or east and see if you can spot the outline of the Teapot. Once you've found it, galactic center lies just above the spout.\n\n\n\nThough the center remains hidden, large chunks of the Milky Way hover like clouds against the black sky. Every puffy piece is comprised of billions of distant stars the light of which blends together to form a misty haze. Here and there are smaller knots. These are individual gas clouds called nebulae and bright star clusters. A pair of 40-50mm binoculars will show many of these wonders and countless fainter stars plainly. If we could magically remove the dust between us and the galactic center, the rich intensity of stars in the Sagittarius direction would be bright enough to cast shadows at night.\n\nTake it all in. Let your eyes follow the arc from the southern horizon clear up across the eastern sky and back down to the northeastern horizon. We live here - can you believe it?","numcomments":0,"author":"astrobob","author_s":"http://astrobob.areavoices.com/author/astrobob/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-22T19:21:12Z","displaydate":"2014-07-22 14:21:12","displaymodified":"2014-07-22 14:38:45","tags":["Antares","black hole","galaxy","Milky Way","nebula","Sagittarius","Teapot"],"spell":["How to find the center of the Milky Way ... and what lurks there","[caption id=\"attachment_105992\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"864\"] Want to know where the center of our galaxy is? Face south around nightfall in late July and find the Teapot of Sagittarius about 'two fists' to the left of bright Antares in Scorpius. The core is a blank bit of sky just above the spout near the 4.5 magnitude star 3 Sagittarii.  Stellarium[/caption]\n\nEver stared straight at the heart of the Milky Way galaxy? Give it a try this coming week. With dark skies and no moon, the time is right.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105993\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"400\"] Artist's view of the 4 million mass black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The hole measures about 28 million miles in diameter. Credit: NASA[/caption]\n\nNotice I didn't say into the heart. No human eyes can penetrate the veil of interstellar dust that cloaks the galactic central point 26,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius. Only X-ray, gamma ray and radio telescopes can 'part the way' and expose the galaxy's dark secret which astronomers call Sagittarius A*.\n\nThere, at the center of it all, lies a black hole with a mass of 4 million suns. The innermost 3.2 light years centered on the black hole swarms with thousands of aged stars and about 100 fresh-born ones, some in very tight orbits about the hole. Gas clouds abound, and there's at least another smaller black hole nearby.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105994\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"800\"] NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, captured these first, focused views of the supermassive black hole at the heart of our galaxy in high-energy X-ray light. Known as Sagittarius A* (A star), the bright flare formed when Sgr A* was consuming and heating matter. The background image, taken in infrared light, shows its location. Credit: NASA[/caption]\n\nOccasionally the central black hole flares to life when a random asteroid, gas cloud or stray star passes too close and gets ripped to pieces before disappearing down the gullet of the beast. Heated by friction, the material sends out every type of light from visible to X-rays and gamma rays. But no one can see all the excitement because it's hidden by light years of dust grains. To the eye, the center looks nondescript and static, but nothing could be further from the truth.\n\nThe Milky Way is beautiful to gaze at this time of year. Take a drive to the country and park your car where the sky is dark and open to the south. At nightfall, you'll see a fiery-hued star a few fists up from the southern horizon at nightfall. That's Antares in Scorpius. Now shift your gaze two fists to the left or east and see if you can spot the outline of the Teapot. Once you've found it, galactic center lies just above the spout.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105995\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"395\"] Closeup of the Spout showing a couple bright star clusters and the Lagoon Nebula, a rich star-forming region. Credit: Bob King[/caption]\n\nThough the center remains hidden, large chunks of the Milky Way hover like clouds against the black sky. Every puffy piece is comprised of billions of distant stars the light of which blends together to form a misty haze. Here and there are smaller knots. These are individual gas clouds called nebulae and bright star clusters. A pair of 40-50mm binoculars will show many of these wonders and countless fainter stars plainly. If we could magically remove the dust between us and the galactic center, the rich intensity of stars in the Sagittarius direction would be bright enough to cast shadows at night.\n\nTake it all in. Let your eyes follow the arc from the southern horizon clear up across the eastern sky and back down to the northeastern horizon. We live here - can you believe it?","astrobob"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:www.forumcomm.com"}},"response":{"numFound":55,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"www.forumcomm.com/3773","permalink":"http://www.forumcomm.com/2014/07/09/grand-forks-herald-launches-walk-to-win-to-encourage-employees-to-move/","blogid":"0","blogdomain":"www.forumcomm.com","hostname":"www.forumcomm.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Grand Forks Herald launches 'Walk to Win' to encourage employees to move","content":"\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2551\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"300\"] Korrie Wenzel[/caption]\n\nBy Korrie Wenzel\nGrand Forks Herald\n\n\n\n\nGRAND FORKS, N.D. - Visiting with Dr. Casey Ryan, outgoing president at Altru Health System in Grand Forks, makes a fellow want to take a walk. A brisk one at that.\n\nEarlier this spring, Ryan announced he would be stepping down as the hospital’s president, effective at the end of the year. And last month, during a meeting with a handful of Herald employees in a conference room at Altru, Ryan said his years in the business as a physician and administrator have convinced him that self-practiced preventative care is really the best way America’s health woes can be solved.\n\nGenetics certainly play a role on our personal health, he said. Meaning, if our parents live through their eighth or ninth decade, we are statistically likely to do the same. Of course, we need to practice our own form of preventative care, too, and refrain from bad habits such as smoking, drinking-and-driving, not wearing seatbelts and especially leading a sedentary lifestyle.\n\n“Primary prevention is huge,” he said. “So, let’s say your mom and dad both died in their 90s. Statistically, if you take care of yourself, you should make it into your 90s. But …”\n\nAnd here comes Ryan’s big right hook: “But, if you weigh 280 pounds and should weigh 180, what are you doing to your knees and hips? And you get diabetes, because there is a little risk in the family but if you maintain reasonable body weight, you won’t get it. And you get high blood pressure. That all drives up the cost of care.”\n\nPretty strong words, but sage advice nonetheless.\n\nMeanwhile, Altru this month is promoting a program called “30 Days of Running,” which is designed to get Grand Forks people off of the couch and onto sidewalks, the Greenway and any other place where folks can stretch their legs, lungs and self discipline.\n\nGoogle that program and check it out online; other events and activities are listed there as well.\n\nSpurred by that recent conversation with Ryan and others at Altru, the Herald recently unveiled its own program to encourage workers to be more active and healthy. We call it “Walk to Win,” and we’re using cash prizes and daily 20-minute paid breaks to entice all Herald employees to get into the habit of exercise through good, short walks in downtown Grand Forks.\n\nThose who choose to participate in the program — which will run through September — are eligible for weekly cash drawings. In the end, we’ll all win.\n\nThe genesis for our in-house program came from that discussion with Ryan and Altru’s other executives. It was a bit odd to hear such firm talk about self-health from a physician who makes a living healing others, but it really gets a person thinking.\n\nSo when downtown this summer, look around and take note of Herald employees who are taking advantage of the program. I’ve seen many of our workers hitting the sidewalks daily — myself included.\n\nAnd the Herald officially challenges other local businesses to do the same. Business owners, presidents and managers may balk at the idea of paying employees to leave the building for 20 minutes a day, but really, isn’t it worth it in the end?\n\nRyan is right. We need to take better care of ourselves, instead of hoping others will do it for us when it’s too late.\n\nWe just need the right motivation to get started, whether that comes from ourselves, from our workplace or from the top-ranking official at the local hospital.\n\nKorrie Wenzel is the publisher of the Grand Forks Herald, and he writes occasional columns for the Herald.\n\nThe Grand Forks Herald is owned by Forum Communications Co., a multimedia information company based in Fargo, N.D., which owns dozens of newspapers, websites, television and radio stations, and commercial printing plants in North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin.\n\n\n","rawcontent":"\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2551\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"300\"] Korrie Wenzel[/caption]\n\nBy Korrie Wenzel\nGrand Forks Herald\n\n\n\n\nGRAND FORKS, N.D. - Visiting with Dr. Casey Ryan, outgoing president at Altru Health System in Grand Forks, makes a fellow want to take a walk. A brisk one at that.\n\nEarlier this spring, Ryan announced he would be stepping down as the hospitals president, effective at the end of the year. And last month, during a meeting with a handful of Herald employees in a conference room at Altru, Ryan said his years in the business as a physician and administrator have convinced him that self-practiced preventative care is really the best way Americas health woes can be solved.\n\nGenetics certainly play a role on our personal health, he said. Meaning, if our parents live through their eighth or ninthdecade, we are statistically likely to do the same. Of course, we need to practice our own form of preventative care, too, and refrain from bad habits such as smoking, drinking-and-driving, not wearing seatbelts and especially leading a sedentary lifestyle.\n\nPrimary prevention is huge, he said. So, lets say your mom and dad bothdied in their 90s. Statistically, if you take care of yourself, you should make it into your 90s. But \n\nAnd here comes Ryans big right hook: But, if you weigh 280 pounds and should weigh 180, what are you doing to your knees and hips? And you get diabetes, because there is a little risk in the family but if you maintain reasonable body weight, you wont get it. And you get high blood pressure. That all drives up the cost of care.\n\nPretty strong words, but sage advice nonetheless.\n\nMeanwhile, Altru this month is promoting a program called 30 Days of Running, which is designed to get Grand Forks people off of the couch and onto sidewalks, the Greenway and any other placewhere folks can stretch their legs, lungs and self discipline.\n\nGoogle that program and check it out online; other events and activities are listed there as well.\n\nSpurred by that recent conversation with Ryan and others at Altru, the Herald recently unveiled its own program to encourage workers to be more active and healthy. We call it Walk to Win, and were using cash prizes and daily 20-minute paid breaks to entice all Herald employees to get into the habit of exercise through good, short walks in downtown Grand Forks.\n\nThose who choose to participate in the program which will run through September are eligible for weekly cash drawings. In the end, well all win.\n\nThe genesis for our in-house program came from that discussion with Ryan and Altrus other executives. It was a bit odd to hear such firm talk about self-health from a physician who makes a living healing others, but it really gets a person thinking.\n\nSo when downtown this summer, look around and take note of Herald employees who are taking advantage of the program. Ive seen many of our workershitting the sidewalks daily myself included.\n\nAnd the Herald officially challenges other local businesses to do the same. Business owners, presidents and managers may balk at the idea of paying employees to leave the building for 20 minutes a day, but really, isnt it worth it in the end?\n\nRyan is right. We need to take better care of ourselves, instead of hoping others will do it for us when its too late.\n\nWe just need the right motivation to get started, whether that comes from ourselves, from our workplace or from the top-ranking official at the local hospital.\n\nKorrie Wenzel is the publisher of the Grand Forks Herald, and he writes occasional columns for the Herald.\n\nThe Grand Forks Heraldisowned byForum Communications Co., a multimedia information company based in Fargo, N.D., which owns dozens of newspapers, websites, television and radio stations, and commercial printing plants in North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin.\n\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"\n\n\n\n\nBy Korrie Wenzel\nGrand Forks Herald\n\n\n\n\nGRAND FORKS, N.D. - Visiting with Dr. Casey Ryan, outgoing president at Altru Health System in Grand Forks, makes a fellow want to take a walk. A brisk one at that.\n\nEarlier this spring, Ryan announced he would be stepping down as the hospitals president, effective at the end of the year. And last month, during a meeting with a handful of Herald employees in a conference room at Altru, Ryan said his years in the business as a physician and administrator have convinced him that self-practiced preventative care is really the best way Americas health woes can be solved.\n\nGenetics certainly play a role on our personal health, he said. Meaning, if our parents live through their eighth or ninthdecade, we are statistically likely to do the same. Of course, we need to practice our own form of preventative care, too, and refrain from bad habits such as smoking, drinking-and-driving, not wearing seatbelts and especially leading a sedentary lifestyle.\n\nPrimary prevention is huge, he said. So, lets say your mom and dad bothdied in their 90s. Statistically, if you take care of yourself, you should make it into your 90s. But \n\nAnd here comes Ryans big right hook: But, if you weigh 280 pounds and should weigh 180, what are you doing to your knees and hips? And you get diabetes, because there is a little risk in the family but if you maintain reasonable body weight, you wont get it. And you get high blood pressure. That all drives up the cost of care.\n\nPretty strong words, but sage advice nonetheless.\n\nMeanwhile, Altru this month is promoting a program called 30 Days of Running, which is designed to get Grand Forks people off of the couch and onto sidewalks, the Greenway and any other placewhere folks can stretch their legs, lungs and self discipline.\n\nGoogle that program and check it out online; other events and activities are listed there as well.\n\nSpurred by that recent conversation with Ryan and others at Altru, the Herald recently unveiled its own program to encourage workers to be more active and healthy. We call it Walk to Win, and were using cash prizes and daily 20-minute paid breaks to entice all Herald employees to get into the habit of exercise through good, short walks in downtown Grand Forks.\n\nThose who choose to participate in the program which will run through September are eligible for weekly cash drawings. In the end, well all win.\n\nThe genesis for our in-house program came from that discussion with Ryan and Altrus other executives. It was a bit odd to hear such firm talk about self-health from a physician who makes a living healing others, but it really gets a person thinking.\n\nSo when downtown this summer, look around and take note of Herald employees who are taking advantage of the program. Ive seen many of our workershitting the sidewalks daily myself included.\n\nAnd the Herald officially challenges other local businesses to do the same. Business owners, presidents and managers may balk at the idea of paying employees to leave the building for 20 minutes a day, but really, isnt it worth it in the end?\n\nRyan is right. We need to take better care of ourselves, instead of hoping others will do it for us when its too late.\n\nWe just need the right motivation to get started, whether that comes from ourselves, from our workplace or from the top-ranking official at the local hospital.\n\nKorrie Wenzel is the publisher of the Grand Forks Herald, and he writes occasional columns for the Herald.\n\nThe Grand Forks Heraldisowned byForum Communications Co., a multimedia information company based in Fargo, N.D., which owns dozens of newspapers, websites, television and radio stations, and commercial printing plants in North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin.\n\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Devlyn Brooks","author_s":"http://www.forumcomm.com/author/devlynbrooks/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-09T15:24:46Z","displaydate":"2014-07-09 15:24:46","displaymodified":"2014-07-09 15:24:46","tags":["Forum Communications Co.","Grand Forks Herald","media","Minnesota","North Dakota"],"categories":["Culture Initiative","Newspaper","Uncategorized"],"spell":["Grand Forks Herald launches 'Walk to Win' to encourage employees to move","\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2551\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"300\"] Korrie Wenzel[/caption]\n\nBy Korrie Wenzel\nGrand Forks Herald\n\n\n\n\nGRAND FORKS, N.D. - Visiting with Dr. Casey Ryan, outgoing president at Altru Health System in Grand Forks, makes a fellow want to take a walk. A brisk one at that.\n\nEarlier this spring, Ryan announced he would be stepping down as the hospital’s president, effective at the end of the year. And last month, during a meeting with a handful of Herald employees in a conference room at Altru, Ryan said his years in the business as a physician and administrator have convinced him that self-practiced preventative care is really the best way America’s health woes can be solved.\n\nGenetics certainly play a role on our personal health, he said. Meaning, if our parents live through their eighth or ninth decade, we are statistically likely to do the same. Of course, we need to practice our own form of preventative care, too, and refrain from bad habits such as smoking, drinking-and-driving, not wearing seatbelts and especially leading a sedentary lifestyle.\n\n“Primary prevention is huge,” he said. “So, let’s say your mom and dad both died in their 90s. Statistically, if you take care of yourself, you should make it into your 90s. But …”\n\nAnd here comes Ryan’s big right hook: “But, if you weigh 280 pounds and should weigh 180, what are you doing to your knees and hips? And you get diabetes, because there is a little risk in the family but if you maintain reasonable body weight, you won’t get it. And you get high blood pressure. That all drives up the cost of care.”\n\nPretty strong words, but sage advice nonetheless.\n\nMeanwhile, Altru this month is promoting a program called “30 Days of Running,” which is designed to get Grand Forks people off of the couch and onto sidewalks, the Greenway and any other place where folks can stretch their legs, lungs and self discipline.\n\nGoogle that program and check it out online; other events and activities are listed there as well.\n\nSpurred by that recent conversation with Ryan and others at Altru, the Herald recently unveiled its own program to encourage workers to be more active and healthy. We call it “Walk to Win,” and we’re using cash prizes and daily 20-minute paid breaks to entice all Herald employees to get into the habit of exercise through good, short walks in downtown Grand Forks.\n\nThose who choose to participate in the program — which will run through September — are eligible for weekly cash drawings. In the end, we’ll all win.\n\nThe genesis for our in-house program came from that discussion with Ryan and Altru’s other executives. It was a bit odd to hear such firm talk about self-health from a physician who makes a living healing others, but it really gets a person thinking.\n\nSo when downtown this summer, look around and take note of Herald employees who are taking advantage of the program. I’ve seen many of our workers hitting the sidewalks daily — myself included.\n\nAnd the Herald officially challenges other local businesses to do the same. Business owners, presidents and managers may balk at the idea of paying employees to leave the building for 20 minutes a day, but really, isn’t it worth it in the end?\n\nRyan is right. We need to take better care of ourselves, instead of hoping others will do it for us when it’s too late.\n\nWe just need the right motivation to get started, whether that comes from ourselves, from our workplace or from the top-ranking official at the local hospital.\n\nKorrie Wenzel is the publisher of the Grand Forks Herald, and he writes occasional columns for the Herald.\n\nThe Grand Forks Herald is owned by Forum Communications Co., a multimedia information company based in Fargo, N.D., which owns dozens of newspapers, websites, television and radio stations, and commercial printing plants in North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin.\n\n\n","Devlyn Brooks"]}]}} Bemidji Pioneer
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The Haskells of Bemidji.

Check out our well-received 2014 Annual Report section, "At Home in Bemidji," where we profile new members of our community, as well as those who have returned to town after ...

The summer issue of in magazine is now available throughout the Bemidji area.

in is a free lifestyle magazine published quarterly by The Bemidji Pioneer. Copies have made available at businesses ...

The Pioneer has a new app for iPad users.

BEMIDJI -- Readers of the Pioneer now have one more avenue to get their news. In an exclusive partnership with Lueken's Village Foods, the Pioneer now has an iPad app. ...

Looking to contact the Pioneer about a question or submit information for publication?  Readers can call (218) 333-9200 for service, but here are a number of ways we can ...

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